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Writing A Post Interview Thank You Letter

You just finished up your interview and totally knocked it out of the park. Your work is done, right?

Not so fast! Many hiring managers pay attention to thoughtfully and quickly (within a day!) crafted thank you email letters. Sending a follow-up thank you message can be the difference between getting hired or rejected. You’re competing against other candidates for the position, and if you’re neck-and-neck with someone else – this can definitely put you over the top. It’s simply another opportunity to positively influence a hiring decision.

Here’s a few practical tips on crafting a thoughtful, contextual thank you note:

1. Use a subject line that’s short and sweet. “Thank you for your time” or, if more informal, “Great to meet you today”.

2. Start with a personalized greeting (“Hello Jane,” or “Hi Steve,”)

3. Open with thanking them for the opportunity and time to connect for the interview and specify the role. Something like, “Thank you for taking the time to discuss the Software Developer opportunity with me today.”

4. Share a short recap of your qualifications and connect it to the requirements of the position. Maybe try, “My software development experience in an agile environment would make me an excellent candidate for the role.”

5. Affirm you interest in the role and outline why you’re excited to join the team. If you really want to go the extra mile, specify something discussed you think you’d exceptionally well at and explain why.

6. To close things out, assume you’re moving on to the next steps and make yourself available for outreach. For example, “I look forward to this discussing this opportunity with you more. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you need additional information.” Share your contact information and send it on over.

There you have it! Now your thank you notes should be a slam dunk. For more advise on crafting thank you notes and leveling up your job search, feel free to reach out to the team here. In the meantime, check out our Job Board.

Written by:
Anthony Ciak
Division Manager – FIT Staffing Solutions
aciak@fitstaffingsolutions.com

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COVID-19 Support Resources

The Marathon team is passionate about helping our communities achieve. The well-being of each individual is critical to this mission.  We recognize that following the emergence of the coronavirus COVID-19, that job seekers, employees, and employers are all facing unprecedented challenges and frequently experience feelings of uncertainty about both their work life and their personal life.  In response to COVID-19, Marathon is following recommendations provided by the National Safety Council (NSC). 

We would like to share this list of available resources made available by the National Safety Council, followed by links to the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and links to specific state and local Department of Health sites that offer updated coronavirus information and guidance.

Suicide Prevention https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/
National Child Abuse Hotline https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/
National Domestic Violence Hotline https://www.thehotline.org/help/
Eldercare Locator https://eldercare.acl.gov/Public/Index.aspx
National Sexual Assault Hotline https://hotline.rainn.org/online
Health Center Locator Tool https://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/
Multilingual resource to connect to local crisis and emergency services http://211.org/
Multilingual resource to connect to reduced-cost social services https://www.auntbertha.com/
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline
24/7 Access to Crisis Counselors via Text               https://www.crisistextline.org/
National Alliance for Mental Illness Support https://nami.org/Support-Education
Self-screening Assessments for Mental Health https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools

Federal Coronavirus Guidance and Updates

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coronavirus Site https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

 

State Coronavirus Guidance and Updates

Alabama:
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Oregon:
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Pennsylvania:
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Rhode Island:
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South Carolina:
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South Dakota:
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Tennessee:
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Texas:
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Utah:
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Vermont:
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Virginia:
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Washington:
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West Virginia:
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Wisconsin:
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Wyoming:
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Written by:

Kendra Strickland

Chief Operating Officer

kstrickland@marathonstaffing.com

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Opening & Operating Safely Amidst COVID-19

Marathon recently released an On-Demand webinar titled – Re-Opening and Maintaining Operations Amidst COVID-19.  We are proud to have collaborated with industry leaders in Arizona and Nevada on this timely topic regarding how to safely re-open businesses during the phases of reopening that are occurring across the nation.  We are deeply appreciative of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Bashas’, BGI, and the Latin Chamber of Commerce of Las Vegas for bringing respected business voices together on this subject.

The webinar includes practical recommendations to help companies resume working arrangements according to CDC guidelines in ways that assure both employees and the public that operations are conducted safely in light of the coronavirus COVID-19. 

Marathon and our partners are staying highly attuned to the needs of our communities during COVID-19.  We believe that employee communication is critical to maintaining a healthy and effective workforce.  We welcome you to tune into this webinar viewable at: https://www.marathonstaffing.com/re-opening-and-maintaining-operations-amidst-covid-19/

Written by:

Kendra Strickland

Chief Operating Officer

kstrickland@marathonstaffing.com

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7 amazing entry-level job search tips to help you find a fantastic position

Are you new to the workforce, or re-entering it after an extended time away? Are you looking to switch careers, but don’t know where start?  If you are, you’ll most likely be seeking an ‘entry-level’ position. 

What, exactly, is an “entry-level” position? The term is HR/recruiter speak for a job that requires little or no experience in a given field or profession.  As you begin your job search, it’s important to remember that your approach to landing an entry-level position will be different (naturally) than seeking positions requiring more experience.  For an entry-level job, the conversation with a hiring manager will focus more on what you can do, not on what you’ve already done.  Keeping this in mind, here are 7 tips to improve your chances of landing a successful entry-level job.

  1. Read each job description carefully.   Employers want applicants who pay attention to detail and need minimum ‘handholding’.  For example, many job descriptions include pay rates and job locations, so don’t email a potential employer to ask about them or anything else that has already been disclosed in the job description.
  2. During every interview, be respectful and alert.  Remember: hiring managers are assessing what you can bring to their organization.  They want to see high engagement and alignment with their cultural norms.
  3. Watch your body language. If youlean, sigh, act tired, fidget, give tentative answers, and don’t make and keep eye contact, it will be the rarest of employers who will proceed with you as a candidate.  Project confidence throughout the interview. 
  4. Send thank you notes.  Yes, send thank you notes even if it’s a phone interview or email exchange.  Thanking potential employers for their time goes a long way toward showing your character and the type of employee you’ll be. 
  5. Dress appropriately. Be presentable and professional. Make sure you’re clean and well-groomed, too.  (This last part should go without saying, but you’d be surprised!)
  6. Ask lots of questions.  In entry-level positions, you’ll be expected to learn starting on day one, and that can include asking lots of questions, so during the interview start asking questions to let the recruiter know you’ve truly imagined yourself employed there and you’re eager to proceed.  Your employer needs to know you’re confident enough to ask for the information you’ll need to succeed in the position.  And remember: the initial interview is your chance to assess if the job is one that fits your needs and career goals. So, do your homework ahead of time.  Look up the company online and see if you can find the answers to three basic questions before the interview:  What do they do? How do they do it? Why do they do it?  If you can convey to the recruiter or interviewer the essence of the answers to these three questions, they’ll know you’re serious about joining and contributing to their company.
  7. Professionalism is key.  Again, the employer is trying to imagine you working inside their organization in the future. Don’t bring small children to the interview.  Don’t go out and party down the night before an interview. Don’t chew gum.  Leave your cell phone in your car or silence it and put it away. You should appear alert, refreshed, even-tempered, appropriately inquisitive, undistracted and ready, willing and able to assume the entry-level role you’re being considered for.

 

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We’re Here to Help

Hi there,

The FIT Staffing team wanted to reach out to check in on you and the one’s you care about. We felt it was important you know we’re available to help navigate through these uncertain times. We want to reassure you that despite the current challenges, our team is working from the safety of their homes and we are doing our utmost to be here for you. We’re still working and are ready to listen, consult and help you find your next career opportunity.

While we understand that COVID-19 has changed many aspects of everyone’s life, we’re happy to share our thoughts on how to help you navigate the job market with new ideas. Some of our candidates have reached out to us in recent days to plan ahead and posture themselves best for continuing their job search given the changing landscape. For example, getting tips on how to stand out in a virtual video interview- which quickly became the new norm! If ideas like that are something you’d like to connect about, we’re happy to share.

We appreciate you very much and we all wish you and your families health and safety during this difficult time. In spite of all of this uncertainty and change, we have been inspired by the way our community’s businesses and neighbors have come together to innovate, connect and care for one another. We will get through this together.

What Do Your Coworkers Need More Of?
Spoiler Alert: It’s starts with a “C” and ends with “ompassion”. It’s not always easy to be patient and understanding, especially with all that’s going on these days. Committing to keep practicing these emotions are what you and your coworkers may need more of. It’s easy to be judgmental considering many folks are dealing with high levels of stress and anxiety. Read more from Harvard Business Review about a few easy ways to remind yourself to deliberately lean into empathy and kindness.

What Have We Been Up To?
What says “Thank You!” better than 150 Friendly’s ice cream cups? Not much! At least that’s what we like to think. It was a delight for the team to deliver some sweet treats to a loyal partner of ours in Agawam.

There’s More! What Else Have We Been Up To?
Hanging out with NERDs – virtually, of course. The New England Regional Developers (NERD) Summit 2020 made a nimble pivot to taking this year’s event fully virtual! They create such a positive environment for people who work, or want to work, in web and related tech so if you didn’t make it this year, hopefully we’ll see you there next. We led a chat about Jobs for Nerds to a packed Zoom meeting room too! Another local tech education event we’re proud to sponsor. They even recorded all the event seminars. Maybe instead of binging Tiger King on Netflix you should check ’em out!

Let Us Help You Level Up Your Resume – And More!
Like we said, some of our candidates have reached out in recent days asking for a hand with posturing themselves best as they continue their job search given the rapidly changing landscape. We’d be delighted to connect about leveling up your resume so it tells a compelling story about why YOU are who they should hire. Please contact us if you’d like to connect! 

CONTACT US

jobs@fitstaffingsolutions.com or call 413-733-6466

FIT Staffing – A Marathon Company
9 1/2 Market St. Northampton, MA 01060

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Managing Large Contingent Workforces: 3 strategies for attracting more talent without increasing labor cost

As the national labor shortage continues to put pressure on employers to meet production demands, many organizations are considering wage increases as one way to achieve required staffing levels.  As strategic advisors to more than 2,000 production-focused businesses, the first question many executives ask us is, “If we increase our pay rate to X, do you think we’ll get higher-quality employees?

In most scenarios, unfortunately, the answer is no.  Although marginally increasing pay rates won’t enhance the effectiveness of your workforce, it will increase the number of applicants who come to you looking for work.   

So, why doesn’t more automatically equal better?

The labor market abides by the same rules of supply and demand as every other financial market. As price/pay rates move upward, the supply of available job seekers increases. Alas, quantity doesn’t equal quality.  So yes, in theory, with more available talent and the deployment of effective HR practices, employers should, on average, be able to enhance the productivity of their workforce. But in practice, for many already short-staffed companies, increasing the supply of applicants will only get them to where they want to be: fully staffed.   

The good news is that, unlike buying a carton of milk, wage is one of many things people consider when deciding where to work.  Because of the multifactored nature of the decision, a strategic employer can differentiate their workplace from competing employers.  So, the need to have a compelling story that goes beyond wage matters when hiring conditional workers (temps, contractors, and per diem workers) to support production, because temporary positions are viewed as inherently riskier than direct employer positions.   

With the above in mind, here are three strategies you can execute now to attract more temporary workers without increasing your cost of labor:

Communicate your company’s value proposition to job seekers: People are driven by purpose. What is your company’s ‘why’ and how are you communicating it to the outside world?  Chipotle and Taco Bell serve similar products, often pay similar rates, and employ individuals with similar skillsets, so why do people flock to work at Chipotle while Taco Bell goes quietly unnoticed?  Don’t get me wrong, I love Taco Bell, but Chipotle’s mission—to provide food with integrity—permeates every business activity, offering a direct, invigorating acknowledgment of the contributions of its front-line staff. 

Workforce development and training: Employees’ expectations of their employers have been evolving for the past ten years. For many people, work must surpass simply collecting a paycheck. Employees want to work for an employer who invests in them. 

For strategic employers, there are plenty of low-cost levers you can pull to meet this need and set your organization apart.  For example, our company, Marathon, builds a custom 30-day onboarding program as an integral part of our large workforce development solution.  Our implementation is specific to the demands of each employer partner, but it often includes creating signals to identify new employers, align mentors, celebrate milestones and enhance the program based on feedback. And this kind of program offers a double benefit, helping retain talent while attracting new talent with a powerful story.

Create an inclusive culture for temporary workers that celebrates their successes:  What do temps, contractors, employees, and per diem workers all have in common? They’re human beings.  Organizations that segregate ‘temps’ from their direct employee base create cultural signals, structures and norms that work against their business goals.  Even though temporary workers aren’t legally employed by your organization, they’re critical to ensuring that your organization achieves its mission. So, it’s crucial, whenever possible, to celebrate contingent workers’ contributions. 

For example, for many of our employer partners, Marathon’s team members are invited to participate in company outings, sports teams, and important safety meetings.  And Marathon frequently builds success profiles for team members who started off with us and then transitioned to having successful careers with our employer partners. 

Activities and acknowledgements like these usually cost very little, but they play huge dividends in an organization’s ability to differentiate its contingent opportunities from its competitors’. 

Written by:

Christopher Panagiotopoulos

Team Member Innovation

chris@marathonstaffing.com

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